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Looking at Numbers Every Which Way


Alignments to Content Standards: 2.NBT.A.1 2.NBT.A.3

Task

  1. 127 is a number.
    • Write it as a sum of 100's, 10's, and 1's.
    • Write its name in words.
    • Draw a picture to represent the number.
    • Locate it on the number line.
  2. 500+60+8 is a number.
    • Write it as a three-digit number.
    • Write its name in words.
    • Draw a picture to represent the number.
    • Locate it on the number line.
  3. Six hundred and nine is a number.
    • Write it as a three-digit number.
    • Write it as a sum of 100's, 10's, and 1's.
    • Draw a picture to represent the number.
    • Locate it on the number line.
  4. The picture represents a number. The big square represents 100, the rectangle represents 10, and the small square represents 1.

    1_affd73f1987151ce62327f68d95afe43

    • Write it as a three-digit number.
    • Write it as a sum of 100's, 10's, and 1's.
    • Write its name in words.
    • Locate it on the number line.
  5. A number is shown on the number line.

    Nl_744_43560f5857e1e03f0ce3bac0d9082dde

    • Write it as a three-digit number.
    • Write it as a sum of 100's, 10's, and 1's.
    • Write its name in words.
    • Draw a picture to represent the number.

IM Commentary

This task gives students the opportunity to work with multiple representations of base-ten numbers. The standard 2.NBT.3 asks students to read and write numbers to 1000 using base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded form. This task addresses all of these and extends it by asking students to represent the numbers with pictures and on the number line, which supports the understanding described in 2.NBT.1. Students who are still grappling with the meaning of base-ten numerals might benefit from having base-ten blocks on hand. Attached is a black line master for a place-value mat which can help scaffold students who are having trouble. Eventually, students should be able to do this task without concrete representations, however.

Solution

  1. 127 = 100 + 20 + 7. This number is one hundred and twenty-seven. Here is a picture (it is a rough sketch based on the picture above without the details for the hundreds and tens):

    3_99516055e6b2076351d7ce4e737f72cc

    Here it is on the number line:

    Nl_127_714e223fdb3432e4f498e3c3edec08ac

  2. 500+60+8 = 568. The number is five hundred sixty-eight. Here is a picture:

    568_0aabc48ac6787daa37bd644ce7a81f1b

    Here it is on the number line:

    Nl_568_c4ff658679e72096fdf10d1f1cd4dc07

  3. 309 = 300 + 9. Here is a picture:

    5_bae427e4f882b5b910166402cd1d7507

    Here is is on the number line:

    Nl309_35cee5e1bcccad2aa2c6132fc2f918a9

  4. 240 = 200+40. This number is two hundred forty. Here it is on the number line:

    Nl_240_d7931957e04f4ad63c25463ca6e1f425

  5. 744 = 700 + 40 + 4. This number is seven hundred forty-four. Here is a picture of it:

    6_98bfbdfc9b9f9d78ded24ff4ece9cd39

Stacie Kaichi-Imamura says:

over 2 years

Small typo error for Solution Part C, second sentence. It reads, "Here is is on the number line:" I think it is supposed to say, "Here IT is on the number line."

Cam says:

over 3 years

Good questions. I think the short answer is that there is no definitive law one way or the other here -- only conventions, and these conventions differ from place to place. I think the "and" is definitely okay with or without, whereas I think the prevailing standard is probably to include the hyphen where you've indicated. Thanks!

Patricia says:

over 3 years

In part c, the word form includes "and" , is that acceptable? In parts a,b,d,e the dash between the tens and ones has been omitted. Was this intentional?

Ellen Whitesides says:

about 4 years

Here is a white paper by Skip Fennell that mentions this task! http://www2.dreambox.com/webmail/14872/398936752/6b578f4b26fc5f18a0684880198de2c6

Patty Cunningham says:

about 5 years

The last examples shows 714, not 744

Kristin says:

about 5 years

Fixed that--thank you.