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Finding a Chair


Alignments to Content Standards: 1.OA.A.1

Task

  1. There are 8 children and 6 chairs. A child sits in each chair. How many children won’t have a chair?
  2. There are 8 children and some chairs. A child sits in each chair. 2 children don’t have a chair. How many chairs are there?
  3. There are some children and 6 chairs. A child sits in each chair. 2 children don’t have a chair. How many children are there?
  4. There are 8 children and 10 chairs. A child sits in each chair. How many empty chairs are there?
  5. There are 8 children and some chairs. A child sits in each chair. Two chairs are empty. How many chairs are there?
  6. There are some children and 10 chairs. A child sits in each chair. Two chairs are empty. How many children are there?

IM Commentary

These tasks types represent Compare contexts for addition and subtraction (see Table 1 in the glossary of the CCSSM for all addition and subtraction problem types).

These problems explicitly describe one-to-one correspondences without using comparison language. Such problems are easier for students to solve than problems that use comparison language such as “How many more?” or “How many fewer.” Please see the K, Counting and Cardinality; K–5, Operations and Algebraic Thinking Progressions Document for in-depth information about issues related to students’ learning of these kinds of problems.

Solution

  1. 2 children will not have a chair.
  2. There are 6 chairs.
  3. There are 8 children.
  4. There are 2 empty chairs.
  5. There are 10 chairs.
  6. There are 8 children.